Natural Remedy for Varicose Veins: Horse Chestnut Tincture Recipe

Home/Natural Remedies/Natural Remedy for Varicose Veins: Horse Chestnut Tincture Recipe

Natural Remedy for Varicose Veins: Horse Chestnut Tincture Recipe

Do you have twisted and enlarged veins in your legs and ankles? I’ve started having these things appear on my legs in places that I know I have crossed my legs a lot in the past, and from the pressure of sitting the same way at the computer most days. I see them and am immediately like….GAH! I’m too young for this! Say it isn’t so! Tell me I don’t have these. But alas, the first signs of varicose veins have appeared on my legs.

So I was thinking yesterday…Cris stop trippin’. You know all about natural remedies, so I’m sure you can find a way to take care of these things the natural way.

So I did some sleuthing. Varicose veins aren’t usually serious, but I found out that they can sometimes lead to other problems and I’m sure you don’t want to have enlarged veins in your legs anyway….. ‘specially for us, chicas! How can we wear our skirts and bathing suits?! I’d like to know…

Anyway, these varicose veins occur when there are weakened valves and veins in our legs. Normally, one-way valves in the veins keep blood flowing from the legs up toward the heart. When these valves do not work as they should, blood collects in the legs, and pressure builds up. The veins become weak, large, and twisted. Varicose veins look dark blue, swollen, and twisted under the skin.

Non-surgical treatments include sclerotherapy, elastic stockings, elevating the legs, and exercise. So stay active peeps! The traditional surgical treatment has been vein stripping to remove the affected veins…… OUCH! Um…no thanks. I’ll stick with the natural remedies.

There are some great natural ways in preventing varicose veins. Horse Chestnut and Broom are the two most used traditional treatments for strengthening and toning the veins. Home remedies use topical astringents such as witch hazel, vinegar and lemon oil to reduce swelling and pain of varicose veins in feet and legs. For those who are suffering from twisted veins, you might want to check try horse chestnut.

Horse chestnut is valued in in herbal medicine for its ability to tone and strength veins and capillaries. It contains aescin, which helps reduce cellulite, and nighttime leg cramps. You can add the following alcohol extract to creams, oils and lotions, or use witch hazel as a carrier for liniments.

You can purchase horse chestnut tinctures online here, or you can make your own at home!  Here’s the recipe:

varicose veins natural remedy.jpg

Horse Chestnut Remedy for Varicose Veins

Ingredients

Tincture Directions

The fresh nuts and leaves are easiest to work with, but dried nuts will work as well.

  1. Chop the nuts into the smallest possible pieces, and cover with vodka. An organic vodka is preferable.
  2. Let it hang out in a dark, cool place for about 4-6 weeks.

Once it’s done, you can add it to olive oil or coconut oil and massage over your trouble spots on a daily basis.

Have you tried this or another remedy for varicose veins? How did it work for you? Leave me a comment to let me know! And be sure to also check out all my other natural remedies here

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By | 2014-05-22T13:26:50+00:00 May 22nd, 2014|Natural Remedies|7 Comments

About the Author:

I'm a former sweet-tooth turned health-nut. After a difficult loss of a first pregnancy and having a second child with a heart condition, I became obsessed with health and wellness. I revamped our entire family's lifestyle, dropped seven pant sizes, and created a website where I could share our story and help support people wanting to make small changes day by day in order to live well. I also support my family by the work that I do here through advertising content, affiliates, and partnership/consultant links within content. When you click and/or order, it puts food on our table. Thanks for all your support, and may you live well and thrive!

7 Comments

  1. Jenn October 6, 2015 at 1:55 am - Reply

    I am very excited to try this horse chestnut remedy for varicose veins. One question…you don’t say how much vodka to use. Is it just enough to cover the chopped nuts?
    And then what is the ratio to the carrier oil you mis it with later?
    Thank you so much! Can’t wait to try this!!!

    • veronica October 17, 2016 at 11:20 am - Reply

      you make your own measurements then , for example if you want a 50ml bottle of the chestnut oil. you’d have 30ml chestnut oil and 20ml carrier oil and make sure it is well mixed!!

  2. Jenny August 27, 2016 at 2:44 pm - Reply

    Jenn,
    Thanks for this article on varicose veins. I would like to try making this at home, but would like to know the ratios of ingredients and how much vodka to use?

    Thank you,
    Jenny

    • veronica October 17, 2016 at 11:18 am - Reply

      if you put it into a jar , you want the vodka to cover the chestnuts up by about a half more so the oil can collect there 🙂 hope it helps

  3. Peter Lynch April 29, 2017 at 3:07 am - Reply

    What is the aescin content of the extract?

  4. Layla May 2, 2017 at 7:58 pm - Reply

    Raw or unprocessed horse chestnut seeds, leaves, bark, or flowers contain aesculin, a compound that is poisonous if consumed in teas or remedies made with raw or unprocessed seeds, leaves, bark or flowers. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, salivation, headache, break down of red blood cells, convulsions, and circulatory and respiratory failure possibly leading to death. (Properly processed horse chestnut seed extract contains little or no aesculin and is considered safe for short-term use.)

    Because horse chestnut can lower blood sugar, use it with caution if you have diabetes and are taking drugs to lower blood sugar (watch for signs of low blood sugar and monitor your blood sugar carefully). The safety of using horse chestnut for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding hasn’t been established.

  5. Layla May 2, 2017 at 8:17 pm - Reply

    Properly formulated Extracts standardized to contain 16 to 20 percent aescin.

    Herb / drug interactions:
    Horse chestnut extract might slow blood clotting, increasing the risk of bruising and bleeding in people taking aspirin, ibuprofen, coumadin or other drugs that slow clotting.

    Horse chestnut may slow the process by which the body eliminates lithium, a drug used to treat the manic side of bipolar disorder. This effect could lead to serious side effects.

    Horse chestnut may lower blood sugar, which could amplify the effects of drugs that lower blood sugar in people with diabetes.

    Other safety concerns:
    Raw or unprocessed horse chestnut seeds, leaves, bark, or flowers contain aesculin, a compound that is poisonous if consumed in teas or remedies made with raw or unprocessed seeds, leaves, bark or flowers. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, salivation, headache, break down of red blood cells, convulsions, and circulatory and respiratory failure possibly leading to death. (Properly processed horse chestnut seed extract contains little or no aesculin and is considered safe for short-term use.)

    Because horse chestnut can lower blood sugar, use it with caution if you have diabetes and are taking drugs to lower blood sugar (watch for signs of low blood sugar and monitor your blood sugar carefully). The safety of using horse chestnut for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding hasn’t been established.

    When buying:
    Look for products standardized to 16 to 20 percent aescin content and follow package directions.

    The common recommended dosage for treatment of varicose veins or CVI is 100-150 mg aescin per day; look for horse chestnut seed extracts that will provide this in two to three doses.

    The safety of horse chestnut in children has not been established.

    So, I write this to inform you that you have no way to determine the aescin percentage when you do a DIY tincture.
    There are serious liability issues with publishing DIY recipes. Unless you are a natural doctor or seasoned professional herbalist it is dangerous to publish these kinds of articles.
    I am not trying to be mean. If someone followed your article and became sick or died you would lose everything in your life. It is serious. The FDA scans the internet regularly for articles such as yours. Then the nightmare begins for you.
    I urge anyone wanting to DIY tinctures to purchase a good book and begin to learn all you can. The info on the net is no where near enough to start making your own tinctures.
    I am an aspiring herbalist and only after a couple of years of study did I make my first tinctures.
    It is medicine and even tho natural it is serious business and nothing to go into without serious background knowledge. If you have interest please reach out to me and I will be happy to share some resources / books I feel are some of the best for beginners. 🙂
    Namaste….

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